Interview: Branden Kramer talks ‘Ratter’, hackers and the FBI

After last year’s Unfriended offered a vision of tech terror told entirely through Skype on a laptop screen, Ratter, the feature debut of writer-director Branden Kramer, ups the unsettling factor by placing viewers in the shoes of a stalker capturing someone’s life via elaborate hacking; a tale entirely visualised through the recording equipment within laptops,… Read More Interview: Branden Kramer talks ‘Ratter’, hackers and the FBI

Review: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (Zack Snyder, 2016)

Of the numerous problems with Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, one of them is quite succinctly illustrated by one scene in the film’s back half. It sees Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck, aka Batfleck) browsing some top secret files, many of which concern the mysterious Diana Prince (Gal Gadot) who’s been popping up throughout the film,… Read More Review: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (Zack Snyder, 2016)

‘The Young One’ Sees Luis Buñuel Tackle the American South

When thinking of Luis Buñuel, a couple of recurring things usually come to mind: the bourgeoisie, eye-slicing, people getting trapped in rooms, foot fetishization and Catherine Deneuve having sex with people. What doesn’t tend to come to mind is the idea of the director helming a feature set in the American South. In fact, the… Read More ‘The Young One’ Sees Luis Buñuel Tackle the American South

Review: April and the Extraordinary World (Christian Desmares/Franck Ekinci, 2015)

One of France’s most beloved comics artists, Jacques Tardi last saw his work adapted for cinema in 2010, when director Luc Besson brought his famous heroine Adèle Blanc-Sec to the big screen. The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec was a fairly big budget, live-action spin on Tardi’s trademark material — a blend of historical fantasy,… Read More Review: April and the Extraordinary World (Christian Desmares/Franck Ekinci, 2015)

Review: The Mermaid (Stephen Chow, 2016)

Splash by way of Frank Tashlin (Splashlin?), with a big dose of eco-message movie and action movie tangents, Stephen Chow’s invigorating, irreverent, slapstick, but occasionally serious, comedy The Mermaid is an odd beast to pin down. You want a light, starcrossed romance? You’ve got it, albeit one where the rich cad (Liu Xuan) is just… Read More Review: The Mermaid (Stephen Chow, 2016)

GFF Review: Louder Than Bombs (Joachim Trier, 2015)

Louder Than Bombs may be the first foray into (fully) English-language features for Norwegian director Joachim Trier and his regular screenwriting partner Eskil Vogt, but it absolutely feels like a logical progression of their impressive prior collaboration, the sombre Oslo, August 31st. As a more expansive feature (narrative-wise) than the 2011 film, which centered on… Read More GFF Review: Louder Than Bombs (Joachim Trier, 2015)