Read Write Here #2

Read Write Here #1

As part of my goal to be more positive regarding the culture journalism world beyond plugging my own crap, I thought I’d start up my own thing (i.e. rip-off) akin to the likes of Criticwire’s Daily Reads or RogerEbert.com’s Thumbnails. These posts won’t be daily, but I’ll try to get at least one up each week or every two weeks.

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ghost in shell

An exchange between three Asian-American members of the entertainment community regarding Hollywood whitewashing, which has been getting a spike in attention lately with controversies concerning Doctor Strange and the live-action Ghost in the Shell:

“If studios, financiers, and producers aren’t willing to commit to making a star out of an Asian actor in the same way they’ve done with the aforementioned white actors, what hope is there to ever have an Asian actor who is “bankable”? It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy, and it really feels like the system is rigged against Asian actors. So much so, that many Asian American actors who were born and raised in the U.S. go to Asia to try to make a name for themselves there: Daniel Wu, Daniel Henney, Leehom Wang, to name a few. Some of them started out not even speaking their ancestral language, and have had to learn it to play leading roles in China, Hong Kong, Korea, etc. Thankfully, some of these actors are coming back home after becoming stars overseas. But isn’t it sad that they couldn’t do that in their home country?”

Read here.

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love witch

For Vague Visages, Justine Smith takes a look at a festival primarily focused on horror and genre films made by women:

“Horror and femininity run hand in hand. A genre unnaturally fixated on womanhood and feminine psychology, much of horror thrives on the mysteries of our bodies: the horror of birth, the allure of sex and our otherness. We are heroines and victims, objects of desire and fear. Women rule horror. The alienness of womanhood feels so bizarre and foreign because it’s seen from the outside. Woman horror fans find refuge in the genre by reading subtext that might never have been intended. Many woman horror fans find catharsis in seeing the monstrosity we feel inside, reflected onto the screen.”

Read here.

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Love-Streams-1

Justine also has this very strong reflection on John Cassavetes’ amazing Love Streams:

“That vulnerability haunts me and haunts my experience of watching Love Streams. Far from a bad thing, it just becomes difficult to parse through. The impossible truth of the performances in Cassavetes’ work feels like a confrontation of the contradictions and fears that we try to hide from ourselves. The pain of watching his movies lies in the familiarity of the characters’ emotional chaos and how desperately liberated they are onscreen. Cassavetes’ films make me ache because I become acutely aware of what makes me feel angry, sad or lonely. They make me angry because it hurts me that Sarah can’t just hide that part of herself from the world… it makes me angry because I can’t help hiding it.”

Read here.

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Bad Neighbours 2

Elena Lazic tackles the surprisingly progressive elements of Bad Neighbours 2/Neighbours 2 in her Little White Lies review:

“One lengthy sequence has sorority ringleader Chloë Grace Moretz’s Shelby giving blunt examples of the sexism of frat parties to Zac Efron’s Teddy Sanders. Teddy does not fight back, but instead admits his carelessness and moves on to better things. Thankfully, all the sexism and feminist talk in the film is not portrayed as a life-changing, righteous, humbling or humiliating experience for our main dude but, disarmingly, as the most natural thing – just another part of his necessary arc of maturation. This is because the film does not portray sexism as the work of a few evil men, but rather as a systemic problem, an old unquestioned habit taught by society to men throughout their lives, and especially in college. Look out for a tremendously witty play on the ‘hoes’ fixation at college parties and you’ll spot the film’s thesis in a single joke.”

Read here.

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Avatar-1

How Avatar made Jordan Hoffman shit his pants. No, really:

“It’s 2:51. It’s 3:06. Any minute, any minute. It’s 3:29. Oh God, I’m gonna blow. I gotta go. I’m gonna run to the bathroom, respond to the call of nature as quickly as humanly possible, and run back across the apartment to give the greatest interview in the history of entertainment journalism.”

Read here.

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Clarisse Loughrey takes on the biggest film in the world right now in the latest episode of That Darn Movie Show:

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‘The Dudeocracy of Film Writers’ at Women and Hollywood:

“”I was one of several women laid off from the same film publication last year, all of whom were replaced by men,” another female film writer told us. “All I can say is that I’m disappointed. Female film critics are few and far between. It feels like every day I hear about another male critic getting hired. It would have been nice to see some chances taken.”

Read here.

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gremlins-2

Nathan Rabin on one of my favourite films, Joe Dante’s Gremlins 2: The New Batch:

Gremlins 2 wastes no time, breaking the fourth wall by opening with Bugs Bunny posing coquettishly atop a Warner Bros. logo before Daffy Duck, as is his wont, busts in and attempts to take over the cartoon with predictably disastrous results. What better, purer way to announce your intention to channel the glorious madness of vintage Looney Tunes than with cameos from Warner Bros. animation’s two greatest icons? Beloved characters from the golden age of Warner Bros. animation turn up at the very end of the film as well (in segments written and directed by Chuck Jones, no less) and in between lies a film that somehow manages to sustain the level of manic invention found in vintage Looney Tunescartoons for an astonishing 107 minutes. It’s an embarrassment of riches, a movie with a million different wild and subversive gags and ideas that are overwhelmingly brilliant and inspired. It’s less hit or miss than hit-hit-hit-hit-hit.”

Read here.

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Not a new video, but I’ve recently rediscovered this very funny takedown of Ben Stiller’s Reality Bites by Lindsay Ellis:

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