Tag Archives: France

MFKZ (Shôjirô Nishimi/Guillaume Renard, 2017)

Scattered throughout animation MFKZ (aka Mutafukaz) – a collaboration between French company Ankama Animation and Japanese studio Studio 4°C (Tekkonkinkreet, Mind Game) – are a number of narrative-interrupting title cards that reflect something about the film’s various eccentricities. Some are posed as questions before expository information, such as in the case of ‘Who Are These Mysterious Wrestlers?’ One, in particular, stands out: ‘The Movies Have Never Seen Sh*t Like This!’ Although you can trace the DNA of a few notable influences, They Live and Akira among them, one might find that an accurate summation of MFKZ as a whole…

Full review for SciFiNow

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The Apparition (Xavier Giannoli, 2018)

Following his 2015 film Marguerite, a comedy drama loosely inspired by a true story, writer-director Xavier Giannoli returns with a drama that’s all about determining the truth in a story…

Full review for VODzilla.co

L’amant double (François Ozon, 2017)

Loosely adapted from a Joyce Carol Oates novel, L’Amant Double sees director François Ozon return to his enfant terrible mode after a couple of relatively more prestigious films, such as Frantz. This involves a reunion with his Jeune et Jolie (Young & Beautiful) star Marine Vacth and making one of his new film’s very first shots take place within her character’s genitalia. Why, yes, this is a very restrained motion picture…

Full review for VODzilla.co

Jeune femme (Léonor Serraille, 2017)

A ball of fire with a mane of fiery red hair, Paula (Laetitia Dosch) begins Jeune Femme by knocking herself out against the door of the Parisian apartment of her now ex-boyfriend. But a blow to the head and a stop at a hospital won’t see an end to this night’s outbursts, as she’s soon back on the street outside her former home to begin another fruitless screaming match through a building buzzer and up at a window above. All she reaps from this is the kidnapping of her ex’s cat and the brief acceptance of defeat – it’s basically the only defeat she accepts in the film…

Full review for VODzilla.co

Lost in France (Niall McCann, 2016)

In the late 1990s, a group of musicians involved with Chemikal Underground, the Glasgow-based independent record label, hired a bus and went on a road trip to a town in rural France to play a one-off concert. Two decades on, a reprisal of the trip for some of those originally involved is the backbone for Lost in France, director Niall McCann’s affectionate, intimate documentary on the label – exploring what’s made Chemikal Underground and its acts endure for 20-odd years…

Full review for VODzilla.co